snowywolfowl: (Canadian Flag)

Dark blue are the Conservatives, orange ridings are NDP, red ridings are Liberal, the two light blue ridings in Quebec are what remains of the Bloc Quebecois, and if you look really hard at the bottom of Vancouver Island you can see the sole Green Party riding marked out in green.



So, what are the trends?

Well lets look at the non-surprises, namely the fact Alberta, Saskatchewan, most of BC and almost all of Southern Manitoba went Conservative. This area is the ideological homeland of the Reform Party that emerged as the dominant form of Canadian political conservatism in the early/mid 1990s and is the location where the Conservatives base is located.  A showing this strong there is no surprise. However, Southern Ontario and New Brunswick jumped in this time which went a long way to the Conservative majority. Those are areas where Liberals historically have done very well in the past so that was a huge blow to them.

The NDP made huge gains this election at the direct expense of the Bloc Quebecois (who historically have owned Quebec and only had to worry about the Liberals as competition) and Liberals. Add in some other gains in BC and a smattering of ridings in almost every province (they took one of the three northern territories and were only shut out in Saskatchewan, Prince Edward Island, and Newfoundland & Labrador) and the NDP's claim that Canada chose them to be responsible for Canada's opposition are valid.

So, long term winners and losers? Obviously the Conservatives. The Tories finally have their much sought after majority and can now govern as they wish, although the other winner, the NDP, will likely use its newfound clout to get some important work done on job creation, pensions and healthcare. Since that last point is always a political hot button in Canada I expect most of their successes to be there simply because the Conservatives can't ignore that.

The Bloc Quebecois may be done. The dream of separating from Canada is really just that, a dream. Once you factor in the economic costs of going alone most Quebecois realize that they are getting a much higher standard of living as Canadians than what they could get on their own. Still, since the dream will likely never die some new separatist party will emerge in its place. Whether its successful or not in gaining electoral office only time will tell.

As for the Liberals, they are in trouble. The Liberal Party likes to see itself as the natural governing party of Canada, and one that is naturally positioned in the centre. That's a fantastic theory but over the last half decade both the Conservatives and NDP have been very successful at co-opting much of their centrist positions for themselves. When you consider that the Liberals haven't had a leader as strong or as charismatic as either Harper or Layton since Jean Chretien its no wonder they appear to be in big trouble. Whether or not the Liberals come back as a party, or if they ultimately decide to "Unite the Left" in a mirror image of what the Reform and Progressive Conservative parties did to take on the Liberals during Chretien's governments will remain to be seen, and will be dependent on the skill and charisma of their next set of leaders.

Only time will tell.
snowywolfowl: (Canadian Flag)

Dark blue are the Conservatives, orange ridings are NDP, red ridings are Liberal, the two light blue ridings in Quebec are what remains of the Bloc Quebecois, and if you look really hard at the bottom of Vancouver Island you can see the sole Green Party riding marked out in green.



So, what are the trends?

Well lets look at the non-surprises, namely the fact Alberta, Saskatchewan, most of BC and almost all of Southern Manitoba went Conservative. This area is the ideological homeland of the Reform Party that emerged as the dominant form of Canadian political conservatism in the early/mid 1990s and is the location where the Conservatives base is located.  A showing this strong there is no surprise. However, Southern Ontario and New Brunswick jumped in this time which went a long way to the Conservative majority. Those are areas where Liberals historically have done very well in the past so that was a huge blow to them.

The NDP made huge gains this election at the direct expense of the Bloc Quebecois (who historically have owned Quebec and only had to worry about the Liberals as competition) and Liberals. Add in some other gains in BC and a smattering of ridings in almost every province (they took one of the three northern territories and were only shut out in Saskatchewan, Prince Edward Island, and Newfoundland & Labrador) and the NDP's claim that Canada chose them to be responsible for Canada's opposition are valid.

So, long term winners and losers? Obviously the Conservatives. The Tories finally have their much sought after majority and can now govern as they wish, although the other winner, the NDP, will likely use its newfound clout to get some important work done on job creation, pensions and healthcare. Since that last point is always a political hot button in Canada I expect most of their successes to be there simply because the Conservatives can't ignore that.

The Bloc Quebecois may be done. The dream of separating from Canada is really just that, a dream. Once you factor in the economic costs of going alone most Quebecois realize that they are getting a much higher standard of living as Canadians than what they could get on their own. Still, since the dream will likely never die some new separatist party will emerge in its place. Whether its successful or not in gaining electoral office only time will tell.

As for the Liberals, they are in trouble. The Liberal Party likes to see itself as the natural governing party of Canada, and one that is naturally positioned in the centre. That's a fantastic theory but over the last half decade both the Conservatives and NDP have been very successful at co-opting much of their centrist positions for themselves. When you consider that the Liberals haven't had a leader as strong or as charismatic as either Harper or Layton since Jean Chretien its no wonder they appear to be in big trouble. Whether or not the Liberals come back as a party, or if they ultimately decide to "Unite the Left" in a mirror image of what the Reform and Progressive Conservative parties did to take on the Liberals during Chretien's governments will remain to be seen, and will be dependent on the skill and charisma of their next set of leaders.

Only time will tell.
snowywolfowl: (Canadian Flag)

Dark blue are the Conservatives, orange ridings are NDP, red ridings are Liberal, the two light blue ridings in Quebec are what remains of the Bloc Quebecois, and if you look really hard at the bottom of Vancouver Island you can see the sole Green Party riding marked out in green.



So, what are the trends?

Well lets look at the non-surprises, namely the fact Alberta, Saskatchewan, most of BC and almost all of Southern Manitoba went Conservative. This area is the ideological homeland of the Reform Party that emerged as the dominant form of Canadian political conservatism in the early/mid 1990s and is the location where the Conservatives base is located.  A showing this strong there is no surprise. However, Southern Ontario and New Brunswick jumped in this time which went a long way to the Conservative majority. Those are areas where Liberals historically have done very well in the past so that was a huge blow to them.

The NDP made huge gains this election at the direct expense of the Bloc Quebecois (who historically have owned Quebec and only had to worry about the Liberals as competition) and Liberals. Add in some other gains in BC and a smattering of ridings in almost every province (they took one of the three northern territories and were only shut out in Saskatchewan, Prince Edward Island, and Newfoundland & Labrador) and the NDP's claim that Canada chose them to be responsible for Canada's opposition are valid.

So, long term winners and losers? Obviously the Conservatives. The Tories finally have their much sought after majority and can now govern as they wish, although the other winner, the NDP, will likely use its newfound clout to get some important work done on job creation, pensions and healthcare. Since that last point is always a political hot button in Canada I expect most of their successes to be there simply because the Conservatives can't ignore that.

The Bloc Quebecois may be done. The dream of separating from Canada is really just that, a dream. Once you factor in the economic costs of going alone most Quebecois realize that they are getting a much higher standard of living as Canadians than what they could get on their own. Still, since the dream will likely never die some new separatist party will emerge in its place. Whether its successful or not in gaining electoral office only time will tell.

As for the Liberals, they are in trouble. The Liberal Party likes to see itself as the natural governing party of Canada, and one that is naturally positioned in the centre. That's a fantastic theory but over the last half decade both the Conservatives and NDP have been very successful at co-opting much of their centrist positions for themselves. When you consider that the Liberals haven't had a leader as strong or as charismatic as either Harper or Layton since Jean Chretien its no wonder they appear to be in big trouble. Whether or not the Liberals come back as a party, or if they ultimately decide to "Unite the Left" in a mirror image of what the Reform and Progressive Conservative parties did to take on the Liberals during Chretien's governments will remain to be seen, and will be dependent on the skill and charisma of their next set of leaders.

Only time will tell.
snowywolfowl: (Canadian Flag)

So, here are the results of the election. I've also put a plus or minus beside each parties numbers to compare how they did in the last election. The numbers tell some interesting stories.

Conservatives:  166   (+23)     
Since 155 seats is the magic number right now in Canada this gets Harper his majority government.

New Democrat Party: 103 (+67)
The NDP are the Official Opposition in parliament with a huge gain in seats.

Liberals: 34 (-43)
Michael Ignatieff didn't keep his seat and the Liberals have suffered a major electoral setback. The question now is this temporary, or the beginning of the end of the Liberal Party now that the NDP seems to have supplanted them on the left wing?

Bloc Quebecois: 4 (-44)
This is a catastrophe for the Bloc Quebecois and their long term survival is in serious doubt, especially if the NDP can deliver in its new Quebec ridings.

Green Party: 1 (+1)
Elizabeth May has a seat in parliament. Uh, now what? Any backbencher legislation she writes isn't going anywhere in a Conservative majority.


So am I happy with the results? No, not really. Stephen Harper campaigned on a lot of things that struck me as false priorities, and his penchant for vindictiveness to opponents and outright contempt for parliament make me concerned that a Conservative majority will see a lot of questionable decisions rammed through under the banner of electoral stability. This is a party that after all filled my mailbox time and time again with flyers screaming how only a Conservative majority will scrap the long gun registry, but never seemed to have anything about job creation, pension protection and alleviating our chronic primary health care crisis other than attack ads aimed at the Liberals and NDP. That doesn't inspire any confidence.

Don't get me wrong. Stephen Harper could prove to be a fair greater PM in a majority than he has been so far. Considering the challenges Canada faces I certainly hope so.
snowywolfowl: (Canadian Flag)

So, here are the results of the election. I've also put a plus or minus beside each parties numbers to compare how they did in the last election. The numbers tell some interesting stories.

Conservatives:  166   (+23)     
Since 155 seats is the magic number right now in Canada this gets Harper his majority government.

New Democrat Party: 103 (+67)
The NDP are the Official Opposition in parliament with a huge gain in seats.

Liberals: 34 (-43)
Michael Ignatieff didn't keep his seat and the Liberals have suffered a major electoral setback. The question now is this temporary, or the beginning of the end of the Liberal Party now that the NDP seems to have supplanted them on the left wing?

Bloc Quebecois: 4 (-44)
This is a catastrophe for the Bloc Quebecois and their long term survival is in serious doubt, especially if the NDP can deliver in its new Quebec ridings.

Green Party: 1 (+1)
Elizabeth May has a seat in parliament. Uh, now what? Any backbencher legislation she writes isn't going anywhere in a Conservative majority.


So am I happy with the results? No, not really. Stephen Harper campaigned on a lot of things that struck me as false priorities, and his penchant for vindictiveness to opponents and outright contempt for parliament make me concerned that a Conservative majority will see a lot of questionable decisions rammed through under the banner of electoral stability. This is a party that after all filled my mailbox time and time again with flyers screaming how only a Conservative majority will scrap the long gun registry, but never seemed to have anything about job creation, pension protection and alleviating our chronic primary health care crisis other than attack ads aimed at the Liberals and NDP. That doesn't inspire any confidence.

Don't get me wrong. Stephen Harper could prove to be a fair greater PM in a majority than he has been so far. Considering the challenges Canada faces I certainly hope so.
snowywolfowl: (Canadian Flag)

So, here are the results of the election. I've also put a plus or minus beside each parties numbers to compare how they did in the last election. The numbers tell some interesting stories.

Conservatives:  166   (+23)     
Since 155 seats is the magic number right now in Canada this gets Harper his majority government.

New Democrat Party: 103 (+67)
The NDP are the Official Opposition in parliament with a huge gain in seats.

Liberals: 34 (-43)
Michael Ignatieff didn't keep his seat and the Liberals have suffered a major electoral setback. The question now is this temporary, or the beginning of the end of the Liberal Party now that the NDP seems to have supplanted them on the left wing?

Bloc Quebecois: 4 (-44)
This is a catastrophe for the Bloc Quebecois and their long term survival is in serious doubt, especially if the NDP can deliver in its new Quebec ridings.

Green Party: 1 (+1)
Elizabeth May has a seat in parliament. Uh, now what? Any backbencher legislation she writes isn't going anywhere in a Conservative majority.


So am I happy with the results? No, not really. Stephen Harper campaigned on a lot of things that struck me as false priorities, and his penchant for vindictiveness to opponents and outright contempt for parliament make me concerned that a Conservative majority will see a lot of questionable decisions rammed through under the banner of electoral stability. This is a party that after all filled my mailbox time and time again with flyers screaming how only a Conservative majority will scrap the long gun registry, but never seemed to have anything about job creation, pension protection and alleviating our chronic primary health care crisis other than attack ads aimed at the Liberals and NDP. That doesn't inspire any confidence.

Don't get me wrong. Stephen Harper could prove to be a fair greater PM in a majority than he has been so far. Considering the challenges Canada faces I certainly hope so.
snowywolfowl: (Canadian Flag)
At current trends the two questions of most importance are:

1. Will the Liberal Party of Canada even be relevant tomorrow?, and;

2. Will the projections of Harper getting his majority hold?


Here's the election tracker if anyone is interested:

http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/canadavotes2011/#/88
snowywolfowl: (Canadian Flag)
At current trends the two questions of most importance are:

1. Will the Liberal Party of Canada even be relevant tomorrow?, and;

2. Will the projections of Harper getting his majority hold?


Here's the election tracker if anyone is interested:

http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/canadavotes2011/#/88
snowywolfowl: (Canadian Flag)
At current trends the two questions of most importance are:

1. Will the Liberal Party of Canada even be relevant tomorrow?, and;

2. Will the projections of Harper getting his majority hold?


Here's the election tracker if anyone is interested:

http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/canadavotes2011/#/88
snowywolfowl: (Canadian Flag)

So in an attempt to figure out which political party should get my vote I just finished the CBC’s Vote Compass. I find the results rather interesting.

First off the final result shows me as being closest to the Liberals, with me being solidly on the Economic Left and slightly Socially Conservative.

What?!? How am I socially conservative? Let’s let the Compass break me down by the issues it mentions:


Cut for those who don't find this interesting: )

Defense: I’m almost on top of the Conservative position here. Ok, while I do think we need to assert ourselves to make sure Canadian sovereignty over the Arctic is respected I do have some differences in how they plan to do it. That untendered choice of the F-35 fighter jet is one decision that I think is fiscally reckless and not likely to support Canadian interests.

Economy: I’m almost on top of the New Democrats (NDP) position. Tax cuts for the rich and for corporations who wish to relocate elsewhere make no sense to me.  Cutting spending may have to happen, but cutting spending without looking at increases in revenues is not a sound economic policy.

Environment: Oh. My. God. I’m almost off the Social Liberalism scale and even more hilarious, I’m right in lock step with the Bloc Quebecois. Considering I wouldn’t go to Quebec City if you paid me that’s funny.  In all seriousness I just like my air, water, soil and food to be as toxin free as possible, and I don’t trust big business to self regulate in a way that favours me or any other member of the public. Safety is a government responsibility, not a free market one.  

Government Programs: I’m assuming they mean things like Employment Insurance, Health Care and other such programs. No real surprise here that I’m almost as far to the Economic Left as the NDP.

Immigration & Multiculturalism: Hmm. According to this I’m more socially conservative here than the Conservatives. This could be warranted but I think my views on Canada’s immigration policy are a little more nuanced than what the compass tracks, especially given its placing me on top of the Bloc’s position, which is laughable considering my opposition to much of what Quebec has tried to pull over the last 15+ years.  If this was broken up into Multiculturalism (specifically Quebec’s role in Canada) and Immigration as separate ideas I’d feel this was more useful as weather gauge.

Law & Order: I’m a little bit socially liberal here, almost halfway (although leaning closer to the Liberal’s position) between Liberals and Conservatives. That’s not surprising. I’m all for throwing the book at violent criminals but I also believe the whole War on Drugs nonsense has failed and that we would be better off looking at alternative tactics. That and the Conservative’s plan to build more jails to deal with all the unreported crime they claim Canada is experiencing strikes me as playing on voter hysteria.

Moral Values: Again, I’m showing up in the socially liberal area, which is why the original overall result was pretty surprising. I really don’t care who marries or sleeps with who (provided it’s between consenting adults), I support a woman’s right to be able to get an abortion if she chooses, and people should generally be treated with respect and dignity.  Believing this doesn’t strike me as being overly radical.

Parliamentary Reform: According to the compass I’m closest to the Green’s here, apparently. Whether that is true or not, I don’t know. What I do know is that the “first past the post” system we use has lately created more and more situations where the numbers of party seats don’t match up with the percentages of who voted for who. I realize that many people hate the idea of “coalition” governments but frankly, I think we’d be better off if we opened up to that. This country is too big and varied to allow people to feel alienated from their government.

Quebec: Yes, the one province that makes a career of holding the rest of Canada hostage with their threats to separate gets its own category.  Apparently both I and the Liberal Party of Canada are dead centred bulls eye in the middle of the compass. Uh, considering how badly Jean Chretien dropped the ball on the 1995 Referendum that’s not comforting to me.

Taxes:  Again I’m in the economic left, right on top of the Bloc and NDP positions. Makes sense I guess.

So there we have it. According to the compass I should be Liberal red. And after checking my answers I found out why I got such a conservative mark on social issues. Turns out I DISAGREED with letting women have abortions, instead of AGREEING with that as I mentioned in the write up. It doesn’t make much difference overall but does show me more accurately on the compass.

Cut for those who don't find this interesting: )



And once again the whole cut thing fails. Oh well. If anyone is curious the link to the Compass is here -  http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/canadavotes2011/votecompass/    You don't have to put in a Postal Code or Riding, and you don't even have to answer the questions about the party leaders. I'd be curious to find out who you're "supposed" to vote for. *chuckle*

 

snowywolfowl: (Canadian Flag)

So in an attempt to figure out which political party should get my vote I just finished the CBC’s Vote Compass. I find the results rather interesting.

First off the final result shows me as being closest to the Liberals, with me being solidly on the Economic Left and slightly Socially Conservative.

What?!? How am I socially conservative? Let’s let the Compass break me down by the issues it mentions:


Cut for those who don't find this interesting: )

Defense: I’m almost on top of the Conservative position here. Ok, while I do think we need to assert ourselves to make sure Canadian sovereignty over the Arctic is respected I do have some differences in how they plan to do it. That untendered choice of the F-35 fighter jet is one decision that I think is fiscally reckless and not likely to support Canadian interests.

Economy: I’m almost on top of the New Democrats (NDP) position. Tax cuts for the rich and for corporations who wish to relocate elsewhere make no sense to me.  Cutting spending may have to happen, but cutting spending without looking at increases in revenues is not a sound economic policy.

Environment: Oh. My. God. I’m almost off the Social Liberalism scale and even more hilarious, I’m right in lock step with the Bloc Quebecois. Considering I wouldn’t go to Quebec City if you paid me that’s funny.  In all seriousness I just like my air, water, soil and food to be as toxin free as possible, and I don’t trust big business to self regulate in a way that favours me or any other member of the public. Safety is a government responsibility, not a free market one.  

Government Programs: I’m assuming they mean things like Employment Insurance, Health Care and other such programs. No real surprise here that I’m almost as far to the Economic Left as the NDP.

Immigration & Multiculturalism: Hmm. According to this I’m more socially conservative here than the Conservatives. This could be warranted but I think my views on Canada’s immigration policy are a little more nuanced than what the compass tracks, especially given its placing me on top of the Bloc’s position, which is laughable considering my opposition to much of what Quebec has tried to pull over the last 15+ years.  If this was broken up into Multiculturalism (specifically Quebec’s role in Canada) and Immigration as separate ideas I’d feel this was more useful as weather gauge.

Law & Order: I’m a little bit socially liberal here, almost halfway (although leaning closer to the Liberal’s position) between Liberals and Conservatives. That’s not surprising. I’m all for throwing the book at violent criminals but I also believe the whole War on Drugs nonsense has failed and that we would be better off looking at alternative tactics. That and the Conservative’s plan to build more jails to deal with all the unreported crime they claim Canada is experiencing strikes me as playing on voter hysteria.

Moral Values: Again, I’m showing up in the socially liberal area, which is why the original overall result was pretty surprising. I really don’t care who marries or sleeps with who (provided it’s between consenting adults), I support a woman’s right to be able to get an abortion if she chooses, and people should generally be treated with respect and dignity.  Believing this doesn’t strike me as being overly radical.

Parliamentary Reform: According to the compass I’m closest to the Green’s here, apparently. Whether that is true or not, I don’t know. What I do know is that the “first past the post” system we use has lately created more and more situations where the numbers of party seats don’t match up with the percentages of who voted for who. I realize that many people hate the idea of “coalition” governments but frankly, I think we’d be better off if we opened up to that. This country is too big and varied to allow people to feel alienated from their government.

Quebec: Yes, the one province that makes a career of holding the rest of Canada hostage with their threats to separate gets its own category.  Apparently both I and the Liberal Party of Canada are dead centred bulls eye in the middle of the compass. Uh, considering how badly Jean Chretien dropped the ball on the 1995 Referendum that’s not comforting to me.

Taxes:  Again I’m in the economic left, right on top of the Bloc and NDP positions. Makes sense I guess.

So there we have it. According to the compass I should be Liberal red. And after checking my answers I found out why I got such a conservative mark on social issues. Turns out I DISAGREED with letting women have abortions, instead of AGREEING with that as I mentioned in the write up. It doesn’t make much difference overall but does show me more accurately on the compass.

Cut for those who don't find this interesting: )



And once again the whole cut thing fails. Oh well. If anyone is curious the link to the Compass is here -  http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/canadavotes2011/votecompass/    You don't have to put in a Postal Code or Riding, and you don't even have to answer the questions about the party leaders. I'd be curious to find out who you're "supposed" to vote for. *chuckle*

 

snowywolfowl: (Canadian Flag)

So in an attempt to figure out which political party should get my vote I just finished the CBC’s Vote Compass. I find the results rather interesting.

First off the final result shows me as being closest to the Liberals, with me being solidly on the Economic Left and slightly Socially Conservative.

What?!? How am I socially conservative? Let’s let the Compass break me down by the issues it mentions:


Cut for those who don't find this interesting: )

Defense: I’m almost on top of the Conservative position here. Ok, while I do think we need to assert ourselves to make sure Canadian sovereignty over the Arctic is respected I do have some differences in how they plan to do it. That untendered choice of the F-35 fighter jet is one decision that I think is fiscally reckless and not likely to support Canadian interests.

Economy: I’m almost on top of the New Democrats (NDP) position. Tax cuts for the rich and for corporations who wish to relocate elsewhere make no sense to me.  Cutting spending may have to happen, but cutting spending without looking at increases in revenues is not a sound economic policy.

Environment: Oh. My. God. I’m almost off the Social Liberalism scale and even more hilarious, I’m right in lock step with the Bloc Quebecois. Considering I wouldn’t go to Quebec City if you paid me that’s funny.  In all seriousness I just like my air, water, soil and food to be as toxin free as possible, and I don’t trust big business to self regulate in a way that favours me or any other member of the public. Safety is a government responsibility, not a free market one.  

Government Programs: I’m assuming they mean things like Employment Insurance, Health Care and other such programs. No real surprise here that I’m almost as far to the Economic Left as the NDP.

Immigration & Multiculturalism: Hmm. According to this I’m more socially conservative here than the Conservatives. This could be warranted but I think my views on Canada’s immigration policy are a little more nuanced than what the compass tracks, especially given its placing me on top of the Bloc’s position, which is laughable considering my opposition to much of what Quebec has tried to pull over the last 15+ years.  If this was broken up into Multiculturalism (specifically Quebec’s role in Canada) and Immigration as separate ideas I’d feel this was more useful as weather gauge.

Law & Order: I’m a little bit socially liberal here, almost halfway (although leaning closer to the Liberal’s position) between Liberals and Conservatives. That’s not surprising. I’m all for throwing the book at violent criminals but I also believe the whole War on Drugs nonsense has failed and that we would be better off looking at alternative tactics. That and the Conservative’s plan to build more jails to deal with all the unreported crime they claim Canada is experiencing strikes me as playing on voter hysteria.

Moral Values: Again, I’m showing up in the socially liberal area, which is why the original overall result was pretty surprising. I really don’t care who marries or sleeps with who (provided it’s between consenting adults), I support a woman’s right to be able to get an abortion if she chooses, and people should generally be treated with respect and dignity.  Believing this doesn’t strike me as being overly radical.

Parliamentary Reform: According to the compass I’m closest to the Green’s here, apparently. Whether that is true or not, I don’t know. What I do know is that the “first past the post” system we use has lately created more and more situations where the numbers of party seats don’t match up with the percentages of who voted for who. I realize that many people hate the idea of “coalition” governments but frankly, I think we’d be better off if we opened up to that. This country is too big and varied to allow people to feel alienated from their government.

Quebec: Yes, the one province that makes a career of holding the rest of Canada hostage with their threats to separate gets its own category.  Apparently both I and the Liberal Party of Canada are dead centred bulls eye in the middle of the compass. Uh, considering how badly Jean Chretien dropped the ball on the 1995 Referendum that’s not comforting to me.

Taxes:  Again I’m in the economic left, right on top of the Bloc and NDP positions. Makes sense I guess.

So there we have it. According to the compass I should be Liberal red. And after checking my answers I found out why I got such a conservative mark on social issues. Turns out I DISAGREED with letting women have abortions, instead of AGREEING with that as I mentioned in the write up. It doesn’t make much difference overall but does show me more accurately on the compass.

Cut for those who don't find this interesting: )



And once again the whole cut thing fails. Oh well. If anyone is curious the link to the Compass is here -  http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/canadavotes2011/votecompass/    You don't have to put in a Postal Code or Riding, and you don't even have to answer the questions about the party leaders. I'd be curious to find out who you're "supposed" to vote for. *chuckle*

 

snowywolfowl: (Canadian Flag)
I'm going to have to read up on the party platforms, not to determine who will be the best for Canada, but rather to determine who will do the least amount of damage. Here's my first glance takeaways of the parties:

Bloc Quebecois - Electorally important but not running in my riding, for obvious reasons. They're a Quebec only party.

New Democratic Party - It's pretty scary when Jack Layton comes across as the most Prime Ministerial leader. Don't get me wrong, I like what he says but how do we pay for it?

Liberals - My mother completely distrusts Michael Ignatieff on the grounds that he seems to just have come back to pad his career by being PM. That's a pretty explosive thing to say about someone who wants to be PM but I don't really have a rebuttal to that. Honestly if they had Bob Rae as leader I'd be more comfortable voting for them. At least then I'd know who I'm voting for.

Conservatives - Uh, no thanks. Stephen Harper has been the leader of a minority government, which means you actively seek bi-partisan support for your agenda in order to get it passed. Given his track record on this, his decision making in the past (Canadians would be dying in Iraq if he had been PM then), and the whole Contempt of Parliament finding I really just don't feel comfortable handing him the car keys.

Well there you have it. My big basic concerns with everyone.  So LJ Hive Mob, who would you vote for? Seriously, non-Canadians (and Americans in general) this is your chance to get back at one foreigner who's never been shy about stating his preferences in other countries elections. ;-p
snowywolfowl: (Canadian Flag)
I'm going to have to read up on the party platforms, not to determine who will be the best for Canada, but rather to determine who will do the least amount of damage. Here's my first glance takeaways of the parties:

Bloc Quebecois - Electorally important but not running in my riding, for obvious reasons. They're a Quebec only party.

New Democratic Party - It's pretty scary when Jack Layton comes across as the most Prime Ministerial leader. Don't get me wrong, I like what he says but how do we pay for it?

Liberals - My mother completely distrusts Michael Ignatieff on the grounds that he seems to just have come back to pad his career by being PM. That's a pretty explosive thing to say about someone who wants to be PM but I don't really have a rebuttal to that. Honestly if they had Bob Rae as leader I'd be more comfortable voting for them. At least then I'd know who I'm voting for.

Conservatives - Uh, no thanks. Stephen Harper has been the leader of a minority government, which means you actively seek bi-partisan support for your agenda in order to get it passed. Given his track record on this, his decision making in the past (Canadians would be dying in Iraq if he had been PM then), and the whole Contempt of Parliament finding I really just don't feel comfortable handing him the car keys.

Well there you have it. My big basic concerns with everyone.  So LJ Hive Mob, who would you vote for? Seriously, non-Canadians (and Americans in general) this is your chance to get back at one foreigner who's never been shy about stating his preferences in other countries elections. ;-p
snowywolfowl: (Canadian Flag)
I'm going to have to read up on the party platforms, not to determine who will be the best for Canada, but rather to determine who will do the least amount of damage. Here's my first glance takeaways of the parties:

Bloc Quebecois - Electorally important but not running in my riding, for obvious reasons. They're a Quebec only party.

New Democratic Party - It's pretty scary when Jack Layton comes across as the most Prime Ministerial leader. Don't get me wrong, I like what he says but how do we pay for it?

Liberals - My mother completely distrusts Michael Ignatieff on the grounds that he seems to just have come back to pad his career by being PM. That's a pretty explosive thing to say about someone who wants to be PM but I don't really have a rebuttal to that. Honestly if they had Bob Rae as leader I'd be more comfortable voting for them. At least then I'd know who I'm voting for.

Conservatives - Uh, no thanks. Stephen Harper has been the leader of a minority government, which means you actively seek bi-partisan support for your agenda in order to get it passed. Given his track record on this, his decision making in the past (Canadians would be dying in Iraq if he had been PM then), and the whole Contempt of Parliament finding I really just don't feel comfortable handing him the car keys.

Well there you have it. My big basic concerns with everyone.  So LJ Hive Mob, who would you vote for? Seriously, non-Canadians (and Americans in general) this is your chance to get back at one foreigner who's never been shy about stating his preferences in other countries elections. ;-p

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snowywolfowl

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